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Patient Perspectives

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Making the Match: The Value of Being a Donor

Making the Match: The Value of Being a Donor

Words: Norward Harris

There was little time to come to terms with my diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and Leukemia in January of 2010. I immediately contacted Dr. Goldberg because I had called on a colleague of his when I was working as a Medical Science Liaison in the pharmaceutical industry. I respected him as a leading hematologist/oncologist who specialized in all types of leukemia and placed my trust and confidence in him along with Dr. Donato and the medical team at John Theurer Cancer Center.  I received world class medical treatment and I am three years post stem cell transplant.  There have been so many advances in treatment modalities and John… Read More >

Glass Half Full

Glass Half Full

We all face challenges in our lives, but it’s how we deal with them that defines us.  Whether our troubles are health-related, financial, or linked to relationships or loss, every one of us encounters difficulties.  I’ve been told that I have a positive attitude towards life and have been asked from where I derive my spirit and how I view my glass as half full.

I believe that some of my attitude is innate, part of it comes from outside influences and still another portion is my choice.  Being blessed with an optimistic outlook is the easy part, choosing to see the good in situations sometimes takes a little practice.

I tend to gravitate… Read More >

Shelley Nolden’s Essay: Part 5

Shelley Nolden’s Essay: Part 5

Six days after Katelyn’s visit, acute pain in my right side wakes me during the night. I ask for intravenous Dilaudid for immediate relief, but the narcotic fails. The physical pain intensifies my anguish over losing Lily and missing Katelyn. My daughter’s growing up without me. What new words has she learned? Does she still ask for me? I don't want her to feel my absence, yet selfishly, I worry that she’ll forget me. Morning takes a month to arrive. Dr. Monroe conducts the daily assessment, and I describe the pain. He loosens his tie and tells the nurse to schedule a CT scan at 2:00 p.m. He looks at his chart and at my face, twisted in agony. “Let’s… Read More >

Shelley Nolden’s Essay: Part 4

Shelley Nolden’s Essay: Part 4

I log into Skype to watch my baby girl, who’s too young to pay attention to me on the screen. Katelyn toddles between her play kitchen and bead maze table. Her disinterest in me is a blessing, for my face remains swollen and my right eye has hemorrhaged, coating my cornea and vision in a haze of blood.

Books, drawing pads, even the television remote control, sit untouched by my bedside. I spend hours staring at the get-well cards and 8”x10” photographs of Katelyn taped to the walls. My parents and Ryan come often. Sometimes we talk, other times we rest. One afternoon, my dad manages to choke out a request: If I die, could I please be buried near their home,… Read More >

Simplicity

Simplicity

Were you amongst one of the 150 guests that attended the first ever Northern NJ Stupid Cancer workshop?

If you were, your heard our key note speaker, Mathew Zachery who inspired us all with the story of his journey through cancer.  He shared the many adjustments he had to make with his diagnosis.  For Mathew, one of these was learning to play the piano again….

This video depicts a piece of what was felt on this special day.  Young adult survivors, their caregivers, and health care professionals united to learn and raise awareness for this unique population of survivors.

 

Read More >
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